All Things AAFS!

For juicy tidbits of information, topics and insights into a student's world that involves archaeological, anthropological and forensic sciences!

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allthingsaafs:

Figure 1: The Suchey-Brooks (1990) pubic symphysis scoring system of the six stages. It is recommended that these illustrations be supplemented by casts before actual aging is attempted
Figure 2: Statistics for the Suchey-Brooks phases in females and males.
Figure 3: Todd’s (1920) ten age phases of modification to the pubic symphysis in adult white males.

Quick Tips: How To Estimate The Chronological Age Of A Human Skeleton – Pubic Symphyseal Surface Method.

This Quick Tips post is the fifth in the series on age estimation on skeletal remains, if you haven’t read the previous post click here, or to start at the beginning clickhere.The previous post provides an overview of the cranial suture method of aging, whereas the first post covers the basics.

This method is one of the most common ways of chronically aging a human skeleton, and involves examining the surface of the pubis of the os coxae.

Over a lifetime the surface of the pubis change; in early adulthood the surface is rugged and is traversed by horizontal ridges and intervening grooves. By the age of thirty-five, the surface becomes smoother bound by a rim, as it loses relief. The pubic symphysis of an adult over the age of thirty-five, continues to erode and deteriorate with progressive changes. 

Click here to read more on All Things AAFS!

If you’re new to the realm of archaeological, anthropological and forensic sciences (AAFS), or are a student needing sturdy and reliable references, or wondering “what archaeology or anthropology textbooks to buy? Check out our new ‘Useful Literature’ page!

(via allthingsaafs)

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allthingsaafs:

Figure 1) Diagram showing the seventeen cranial suture sites.

Figure 2) Table demonstrating Meindl and Lovejoy (1985)’s composite scores of the sutures on the vault and lateral-anterior, respectively, in relation to mean chronological age.

Quick Tips: How To Estimate The Chronological Age Of A Human Skeleton – Cranial Suture Closure Method.

This is the 4th blog post in this Quick Tips series on chronologically dating human skeletal remains, if you haven’t read the first post click here to start at the beginning. In my previous blog post I introduced the method of chronologically dating sub-adults using dentition, you can find out this information by clicking here.

Another method of chronologically aging human skeletal remains is by observing the cranial suture closure sites. The human skull has seventeen unique cranial fusion sites (Figure 1), that are positioned on the vault, the lateral-anterior sites, and the maxillary suture

Click here to read the full blog post and learn the 17 suture points on All Things AAFS!

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Unusual-ology: 800 year old monk’s skeletal remains found in a cliff face.

Unusual-ology: 800 year old monk’s skeletal remains found in a cliff face.

The recent winter storms that rocked Britain have uncovered a lot of the isles’ hidden archaeology including a petrified forest in Wales, but it has also damaged many coastal heritage sites. In this case, the storms unearthed the skeletal remains of what is thought to be an 800-year-old medieval monk, which were found poking out of a cliff in Monknash, South Wales.

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Filed under 800 year old monk Anthropology Archaeology British archaeology Cistercian monastery Monk monk found in cliff Monknash Monks in Wales South Wales Archaeology unusual Welsh archaeology

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Giveaway Winner:

Congratulations to Katelyn Barnes on winning our ‘Arch.Traveller’ archaeology tool roll in our latest giveaway!

As a thank you to all who entered our competition, use this code: ‘GIVEAWAY10’ to get 10% off our Etsy Store! We’ve just added some delicate finds/skeletal remains tool rolls to our shop, so have a gander!
https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/AllThingsAAFS

Filed under archaeology anthropology paleontology palaeontology bioarchaeology Bones Temperance Brennan skeletal remains tools archaeologist anthropologist

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Figure 1: A) Transverse, B) Oblique, C) Spiral, D) Comminuted, E) Greenstick, and F) Impacted fracture.

Figure 2: A) Butterfly, B) Longitudinal, C) Segmented, D) Hairline, and E) Avulsion.

Figure 3: A) Boxer’s fracture, B) Bennett’s fractures, C) Parry’s or Monteggia’s fracture, D) Colles’ fractures, and E) Smith’s fractures.

Figure 4: Skull with signs of post-mortem fractures. This photo is from a practical lab session.

Quick Tips: Fracture Types.

Here is a list of all my Quick Tips topics to date on fracture types, click the relevant title to learn about the fractures within the figure. Below each title is a preview of the blog content, so if you’re interested click the link to learn more. This skill is very important when assessing human remains, whether they are in an archaeological, anthropological or forensic context.

Quick Tips: Fracture Types – The Basics (Figure 1)

In this Quick Tips post I will show you some ways to identify and deduce common fracture types and their key characteristics. The definition of a fracture is a break in the continuity of a bone. There are three major causes of fractures: acute injury (an accident); underlying disease which then weakens the bone making it susceptible to fractures; and repeated stress (as seen in athletes). All fracture types can be placed in two categories; open and closed.

Quick Tips: Fracture Types – The Basics Pt 2 (Figure 2)

A) Butterfly Fracture: Butterfly fractures usually affect long bones and can be caused by car accidents or by being knocked side on.

B) Longitudinal Fracture: As a transverse fracture is a bone along the horizontal axis, a longitudinal fracture is along the vertical axis.

Quick Tips: Named Fractures – Part One: Hand & Forearms (Figure 3)

This blog post will highlight some of the common ‘named’ fractures you will often find in archaeological and anthropological settings. It is important to know their characteristics and common causes to help establish what happened – whether the fracture was received by defensive or offensive action, or purely accidental. This blog post will examine the first five common fractures associated with the hand and forearm bones.

Quick Tips: How can you tell if a skeletal fracture is ante, peri or post-mortem? (Figure 4)

There is a relatively easy way to see whether a fracture to a skeleton is ante, peri or even post mortem. It is essential to detail and deduce which category a fracture falls into, as this is very important to see whether the fracture had played a part in the person’s death.

To first classify a fracture we need to understand what the different categories mean, some of you will already know these terminology but here’s a quick reminder:

  • If a fracture is ante-mortem, it means that the fracture was made before death of the persons.
  • With peri-mortem fractures, it means that the fracture was received at or near the time of death of the persons – so could have been the fatal strike.
  • Post-mortem fractures are fractures that have been received after death, so during the time from death to the time of recovery. These fractures are usually from excavation processes, dismemberment, or even natural processes (soil, animal and plant activity).

Read more anthropology/archaeology quick tips from All Things AAFS! by clicking here!

 

(Source: allthingsaafs)

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allthingsaafs:

Top Fractures:A) Transverse, B) Oblique, C) Spiral, D) Comminuted, E) Greenstick, and F) Impacted fracture.

Bottom Fractures: A) Butterfly, B) Longitudinal, C) Segmented, D) Hairline, and E) Avulsion fracture.


Do you know your basic fracture types? This is a very important essential skill to have when studying archaeology and anthropology. These skills are also widely  transferable to other subjects, such as forensic science and medicine. But these posts focus on the archaeological significance of the fractures, but can be used as a starting point for other disciplines.

Quick Tips: Fracture Types – The Basics.

To learn about the top six ‘basic’ fractures, and the two categories,open and closed, that fractures can be placed into, then check out thisblog post. In this post you will learn the characteristics of transverse, oblique, spiral, comminuted, greenstick, and impacted fractures. 

Once you’ve grasped the basics of these first few fractures, then check out the below blog post to learn about butterfly, longitudinal, segmented, hairline, and avulsion fractures.

Quick Tips: Fracture Types – The Basics Pt 2.

Once you’ve mastered these you have learnt the basic fracture types that you can come across in an anthropological/archaeological context, then you’re ready to learn whether a fracture is ante, peri or even post-mortem by checking out this post:

Quick Tips: How can you tell if a skeletal fracture is ante, peri or post-mortem?

Stay tuned for more Quick Tips posts which will cover the common ‘named’ fractures, such as Bennett’s and Parry’s, and their characteristics and causes!

253 notes

allthingsaafs:

Figure 1) Diagram showing the seventeen cranial suture sites.

Figure 2) Table demonstrating Meindl and Lovejoy (1985)’s composite scores of the sutures on the vault and lateral-anterior, respectively, in relation to mean chronological age.

Quick Tips: How To Estimate The Chronological Age Of A Human Skeleton – Cranial Suture Closure Method.

This is the 4th blog post in this Quick Tips series on chronologically dating human skeletal remains, if you haven’t read the first post click here to start at the beginning. In my previous blog post I introduced the method of chronologically dating sub-adults using dentition, you can find out this information by clicking here.

Another method of chronologically aging human skeletal remains is by observing the cranial suture closure sites. The human skull has seventeen unique cranial fusion sites (Figure 1), that are positioned on the vault, the lateral-anterior sites, and the maxillary suture

Click here to read the full blog post and learn the 17 suture points on All Things AAFS!

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FOUR DAYS LEFT TO ENTER FOR OUR GIVEAWAY!

allthingsaafs:

There are only four days left to enter our giveaway for a chance to win this unique, handcrafted ‘Archaeology Traveller’ archaeology / anthropology tool roll pictured below!!!!

The prize tool kit contains:

  • 12x Stainless Steel Small Finds Archaeology Tools!
  • 4x Tweezers - to allow you to…

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FOUR DAYS LEFT TO ENTER FOR OUR GIVEAWAY!

There are only four days left to enter our giveaway for a chance to win this unique, handcrafted ‘Archaeology Traveller’ archaeology / anthropology tool roll pictured below!!!!

The prize tool kit contains:

  • 12x Stainless Steel Small Finds Archaeology Tools!
  • 4x Tweezers - to allow you to delicately handle finds!
  • 1x Sharpie permanent marker pen - for labelling tool find trays or bags!
  • 1x Mechanical Pencil - to help you write when the weather is gloomy and rainy!
  • 1x HB Pencil - to allow you to sketch your finds, and with extra room to add your own personal tools.

To enter our completely free and worldwide Giveaway:

Read our original Tumblr post for information on how to enter via tumblr, by clicking here.

Or to double your chances of winning ‘Share and Like’ the photo of the giveaway on Facebook (Click here for the photo).

PS. You can get family members, and friends to reblog/share/like this to give you more chances as we really want to spoil someone with this! :D

Visit our Etsy store: https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/AllThingsAAFS, to see our full range of archaeology / anthropology tool rolls!

Filed under archaeology anthropology paleo osteology forensic anthropology forensic archaeology bones forensic anthro Bones Temperance Brennan Brennan and Booth Booth Dinosaurs foxes superhero archaeologist anthropologist excavation digs fieldwork archaeology tool roll archaeology tool kit anthropology tool roll anthropology tool kit bioarchaeology bioanthropology past horizons digging skeletal remains remains

291 notes

allthingsaafs:

Figure 1: The Suchey-Brooks (1990) pubic symphysis scoring system of the six stages. It is recommended that these illustrations be supplemented by casts before actual aging is attempted
Figure 2: Statistics for the Suchey-Brooks phases in females and males.
Figure 3: Todd’s (1920) ten age phases of modification to the pubic symphysis in adult white males.

Quick Tips: How To Estimate The Chronological Age Of A Human Skeleton – Pubic Symphyseal Surface Method.

This Quick Tips post is the fifth in the series on age estimation on skeletal remains, if you haven’t read the previous post click here, or to start at the beginning clickhere.The previous post provides an overview of the cranial suture method of aging, whereas the first post covers the basics.

This method is one of the most common ways of chronically aging a human skeleton, and involves examining the surface of the pubis of the os coxae.

Over a lifetime the surface of the pubis change; in early adulthood the surface is rugged and is traversed by horizontal ridges and intervening grooves. By the age of thirty-five, the surface becomes smoother bound by a rim, as it loses relief. The pubic symphysis of an adult over the age of thirty-five, continues to erode and deteriorate with progressive changes. 

Click here to read more on All Things AAFS!

If you’re new to the realm of archaeological, anthropological and forensic sciences (AAFS), or are a student needing sturdy and reliable references, or wondering “what archaeology or anthropology textbooks to buy? Check out our new ‘Useful Literature’ page!

(via allthingsaafs)

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allthingsaafs:

Figure 1:One of the two-dozen Roman era skulls found beneath London’s Liverpool Street Station.

Figure 2: This Roman era skull, believed to belong to a gladiator, shows evidence of sharp force trauma.

Figure 3: This mandible found at the Roman era site, shows evidence of sharp force trauma – leading experts to believe that these are the outcomes from being a gladiator in Roman London.

Mystery Of Thirty Nine Skulls Discovered At London Wall Finally Solved.

In 1988, thirty-nine skulls were unearthed below the Guildhall in London. Their discovery left many unanswered questions, but after being recently re-examined – it is now believed that these skulls are the decapitated heads of gladiators.

Click here to read more on this discover on All Things AAFS!

If you’re new to the realm of archaeological, anthropological and forensic sciences (AAFS), or are a student needing sturdy and reliable references, or wondering “what archaeology or anthropology textbooks to buy? Check out our new ‘Useful Literature’ page!

(via allthingsaafs)

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allthingsaafs:

Figure 1: The male prehistoric spider fossil that was found in the Daohugou beds of Inner Mongolia.

Figure 2: While the male spider (left) does resembles the Nephila jurassica (right), its shape and size has suggested it belonged to another genus.

Unusual-ology: ‘Rare’ Prehistoric Spider Fossil Found.

A fossil of a large male prehistoric spider has been recently found in the Daohugou beds of Inner Mongolia. The spider’s species has stumped scientists, who have now proposed a new genus for the discovery called Mongolarachne.

Click here to read more on All Things AAFS!

If you’re new to the realm of archaeological, anthropological and forensic sciences (AAFS), or are a student needing sturdy and reliable references, or wondering “what archaeology or anthropology textbooks to buy? Check out our new ‘Useful Literature’ page!

(via allthingsaafs)